Building Decent Workplaces for Women and Informal Workers in the Garment Industry was a multi-country project led by Women Working Worldwide (WWW) and its partners, funded by DFID’s RAGS (Responsible & Accountable Garment Sector) Challenge Fund and Comic Relief. It aimed to achieve improvements in working conditions for formal and informal garment workers in Lesotho, India and Bangladesh through mapping, training and organising women workers and through engagement with UK retailers. The project targeted 10,000 workers in 10 factories in Lesotho, led by trade unions, and 2,000 home/informal workers in Tamil Nadu, India, led by NGO project partners SAVE and Read.

The evaluation aimed to provide reliable information on the project performance, examine the challenges of a multi-country project, understand how useful different methodologies had been and understand issues that had affected WWW’s operations.

This complex evaluation required a synthesis of volumes of documentation and reporting and participatory engagement with a large number of hard-to-reach stakeholders.

Louise collaborated with South Africa-based Margaret Jack to visit the programmes in India and Lesotho concurrently. Using an evaluation matrix, we effectively coordinated sources of information and ensured consistency of evaluation approach and information handling across the projects.

Margaret visited the project in Lesotho to conduct interviews. Louise visited Tamil Nadu to visit project partners and conduct workshops and individual interviews with women in India. She cooperated closely with the NGO partner Home Workers Worldwide and a local interpreter to deliver facilitated focus groups and workshop exercises to map the impacts of the project and examine drivers for, and barriers to change. We also interviewed a range of other stakeholders from the garment industry, projects and funders.

Louise and Margaret worked together to produce a final evaluation report which provided evidence, analysis and learning along with recommendations on areas including:

  • Project impacts, achievements and analysis of what worked (or did not) and why
  • Identifying good practice in project design and delivery (effective, efficient, sustainable and value for money) eg self-replicating, sustainable model of Self-Help Groups in Tamil Nadu
  • Identifying opportunities to scale up and consolidate project impacts
  • Building the capacity of local partners to understand and engage with the supply chain to UK based retailers to enable factory owner engagement and multi-stakeholder action
  • Strengthening systems and support for the development of effective training materials which are women focused and enable women to act to change their circumstances rather than simply to raise awareness
  • Caste and women’s social status’ affect on projects supporting decent work – making projects relevant for different contexts
  • Project start up, management, communications, monitoring and evaluation with a focus on project partners being fully involved and informed of systems and requirements at start up
  • Managing for resilience to projects in terms of staffing, monitoring and responding to challenges

Building Decent Workplaces for Women and Informal Workers in the Garment Industry was a multi-country project led by Women Working Worldwide (WWW) and its partners, funded by DFID’s RAGS (Responsible & Accountable Garment Sector) Challenge Fund and Comic Relief. It aimed to achieve improvements in working conditions for formal and informal garment workers in Lesotho, India and Bangladesh through mapping, training and organising women workers and through engagement with UK retailers. The project targeted 10,000 workers in 10 factories in Lesotho, led by trade unions, and 2,000 home/informal workers in Tamil Nadu, India, led by NGO project partners SAVE and Read.

The evaluation aimed to provide reliable information on the project performance, examine the challenges of a multi-country project, understand how useful different methodologies had been and understand issues that had affected WWW’s operations.

This complex evaluation required a synthesis of volumes of documentation and reporting and participatory engagement with a large number of hard-to-reach stakeholders.

Louise collaborated with South Africa-based Margaret Jack to visit the programmes in India and Lesotho concurrently. Using an evaluation matrix, we effectively coordinated sources of information and ensured consistency of evaluation approach and information handling across the projects.

Margaret visited the project in Lesotho to conduct interviews. Louise visited Tamil Nadu to visit project partners and conduct workshops and individual interviews with women in India. She cooperated closely with the NGO partner Home Workers Worldwide and a local interpreter to deliver facilitated focus groups and workshop exercises to map the impacts of the project and examine drivers for, and barriers to change. We also interviewed a range of other stakeholders from the garment industry, projects and funders.

Louise and Margaret worked together to produce a final evaluation report which provided evidence, analysis and learning along with recommendations on areas including:

  • Project impacts, achievements and analysis of what worked (or did not) and why
  • Identifying good practice in project design and delivery (effective, efficient, sustainable and value for money) eg self-replicating, sustainable model of Self-Help Groups in Tamil Nadu
  • Identifying opportunities to scale up and consolidate project impacts
  • Building the capacity of local partners to understand and engage with the supply chain to UK based retailers to enable factory owner engagement and multi-stakeholder action
  • Strengthening systems and support for the development of effective training materials which are women focused and enable women to act to change their circumstances rather than simply to raise awareness
  • Caste and women’s social status’ affect on projects supporting decent work – making projects relevant for different contexts
  • Project start up, management, communications, monitoring and evaluation with a focus on project partners being fully involved and informed of systems and requirements at start up
  • Managing for resilience to projects in terms of staffing, monitoring and responding to challenges

Building Decent Workplaces for Women and Informal Workers in the Garment Industry was a multi-country project led by Women Working Worldwide (WWW) and its partners, funded by DFID’s RAGS (Responsible & Accountable Garment Sector) Challenge Fund and Comic Relief. It aimed to achieve improvements in working conditions for formal and informal garment workers in Lesotho, India and Bangladesh through mapping, training and organising women workers and through engagement with UK retailers. The project targeted 10,000 workers in 10 factories in Lesotho, led by trade unions, and 2,000 home/informal workers in Tamil Nadu, India, led by NGO project partners SAVE and Read.

The evaluation aimed to provide reliable information on the project performance, examine the challenges of a multi-country project, understand how useful different methodologies had been and understand issues that had affected WWW’s operations.

This complex evaluation required a synthesis of volumes of documentation and reporting and participatory engagement with a large number of hard-to-reach stakeholders.

Louise collaborated with South Africa-based Margaret Jack to visit the programmes in India and Lesotho concurrently. Using an evaluation matrix, we effectively coordinated sources of information and ensured consistency of evaluation approach and information handling across the projects.

Margaret visited the project in Lesotho to conduct interviews. Louise visited Tamil Nadu to visit project partners and conduct workshops and individual interviews with women in India. She cooperated closely with the NGO partner Home Workers Worldwide and a local interpreter to deliver facilitated focus groups and workshop exercises to map the impacts of the project and examine drivers for, and barriers to change. We also interviewed a range of other stakeholders from the garment industry, projects and funders.

Louise and Margaret worked together to produce a final evaluation report which provided evidence, analysis and learning along with recommendations on areas including:

  • Project impacts, achievements and analysis of what worked (or did not) and why
  • Identifying good practice in project design and delivery (effective, efficient, sustainable and value for money) eg self-replicating, sustainable model of Self-Help Groups in Tamil Nadu
  • Identifying opportunities to scale up and consolidate project impacts
  • Building the capacity of local partners to understand and engage with the supply chain to UK based retailers to enable factory owner engagement and multi-stakeholder action
  • Strengthening systems and support for the development of effective training materials which are women focused and enable women to act to change their circumstances rather than simply to raise awareness
  • Caste and women’s social status’ affect on projects supporting decent work – making projects relevant for different contexts
  • Project start up, management, communications, monitoring and evaluation with a focus on project partners being fully involved and informed of systems and requirements at start up
  • Managing for resilience to projects in terms of staffing, monitoring and responding to challenges

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